V & J Elope - A Marriage Made for Two

I had been spending a lot of time thinking about my love for A Practical Wedding (APW) and the community that thrives because of it.  Filled with real stories and real weddings, ‘vintage’ weddings that are actually from 30 years ago, and reflections from real people instead of staged models, the blog brings together couples who are practical if a bit unique, and vendors who love what they do and want to be a part of something real.

Right in the middle of a few weeks obsessing over my love of APW, my heart skipped a beat when I read V&J’s email. 

They had decided to give up the big wedding they were planning in favor of having a practical wedding- a wedding about just them and their exciting love, a marriage made for two.  The next day we talked, and realized how right we were for each other, a match made in APW fashion. 

One week later, I arrived at their hotel room door, bouquet in hand, beaming with shared excitement, their only guest and witness.  I helped V make her veil on the fly, and then signed on the dotted line.  I watched (and shared) their expressions, evolving throughout the day - a tad of anxious excitement, the itching of ‘hurry up and wait’ between the paper signing and the ceremony, the tears throughout the beautiful vows, and then the sheer joy of “OHMYGOD we’re MARRIED!!" 

Together, we encountered a friendly judge who insisted on taking photos throughout the service, a street photographer who followed us and took a hundred photos of V&J for the newspaper,  and some really excited bystanders who wanted to direct our flow.  We took turns holding their Ring BEAR, we drank wine and ate cupcakes, we wandered, we absorbed the perfection of a rare SF hot sunny day. 

It was (in my humble opinion) a day of perfection, a day about V&J and love and marriage.  It was a day that white dresses and dance floors were less important than being happy together.  Biggest-Endless-Congratulations to V&J, and infinite thanks for trusting me to be by your side.  You’re MARRIED!



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